Archive for the 'Font' Category

Green Piloww Font | dafont.com

Green Piloww Font | dafont.com

Karabine | dafont.com

Karabine | dafont.com

CSS2 generic fonts

  • tags: font, css, css2, generic

    • Generic font families

    serif

    Glyphs of serif fonts, as the term is used in CSS, have finishing strokes, flared or tapering ends, or have actual serifed endings (including slab serifs). Serif fonts are typically proportionately-spaced. They often display a greater variation between thick and thin strokes than fonts from the ‘sans-serif’ generic font family. CSS uses the term ‘serif’ to apply to a font for any script, although other names may be more familiar for particular scripts, such as Mincho (Japanese), Sung or Song (Chinese), Totum or Kodig (Korean). Any font that is so described may be used to represent the generic ‘serif’ family.

    Examples of fonts that fit this description include:

    Latin fonts Times New Roman, Bodoni, Garamond, Minion Web, ITC Stone Serif, MS Georgia, Bitstream Cyberbit
    Greek fonts Bitstream Cyberbit
    Cyrillic fonts Adobe Minion Cyrillic, Excelcior Cyrillic Upright, Monotype Albion 70, Bitstream Cyberbit, ER Bukinst
    Hebrew fonts New Peninim, Raanana, Bitstream Cyberbit
    Japanese fonts Ryumin Light-KL, Kyokasho ICA, Futo Min A101
    Arabic fonts Bitstream Cyberbit
    Cherokee fonts Lo Cicero Cherokee

sans-serif

Glyphs in sans-serif fonts, as the term is used in CSS, have stroke endings that are plain — without any flaring, cross stroke, or other ornamentation. Sans-serif fonts are typically proportionately-spaced. They often have little variation between thick and thin strokes, compared to fonts from the ‘serif’ family. CSS uses the term ‘sans-serif’ to apply to a font for any script, although other names may be more familiar for particular scripts, such as Gothic (Japanese), Kai (Chinese), or Pathang (Korean). Any font that is so described may be used to represent the generic ‘sans-serif’ family.

Examples of fonts that fit this description include:

Latin fonts MS Trebuchet, ITC Avant Garde Gothic, MS Arial, MS Verdana, Univers, Futura, ITC Stone Sans, Gill Sans, Akzidenz Grotesk, Helvetica
Greek fonts Attika, Typiko New Era, MS Tahoma, Monotype Gill Sans 571, Helvetica Greek
Cyrillic fonts Helvetica Cyrillic, ER Univers, Lucida Sans Unicode, Bastion
Hebrew fonts Arial Hebrew, MS Tahoma
Japanese fonts Shin Go, Heisei Kaku Gothic W5
Arabic fonts MS Tahoma

cursive

Glyphs in cursive fonts, as the term is used in CSS, generally have either joining strokes or other cursive characteristics beyond those of italic typefaces. The glyphs are partially or completely connected, and the result looks more like handwritten pen or brush writing than printed letterwork. Fonts for some scripts, such as Arabic, are almost always cursive. CSS uses the term ‘cursive’ to apply to a font for any script, although other names such as Chancery, Brush, Swing and Script are also used in font names.

Examples of fonts that fit this description include:

Latin fonts Caflisch Script, Adobe Poetica, Sanvito, Ex Ponto, Snell Roundhand, Zapf-Chancery
Cyrillic fonts ER Architekt
Hebrew fonts Corsiva
Arabic fonts DecoType Naskh, Monotype Urdu 507

fantasy

Fantasy fonts, as used in CSS, are primarily decorative while still containing representations of characters (as opposed to Pi or Picture fonts, which do not represent characters). Examples include:

Latin fonts Alpha Geometrique, Critter, Cottonwood, FB Reactor, Studz

monospace

The sole criterion of a monospace font is that all glyphs have the same fixed width. (This can make some scripts, such as Arabic, look most peculiar.) The effect is similar to a manual typewriter, and is often used to set samples of computer code.

Examples of fonts which fit this description include:

Latin fonts Courier, MS Courier New, Prestige, Everson Mono
Greek Fonts MS Courier New, Everson Mono
Cyrillic fonts ER Kurier, Everson Mono
Japanese fonts Osaka Monospaced
Cherokee fonts Everson Mono

キーボードフォント

free font FOD

free Japanese font アニト-M

タイプラボ頒布フォントMiniSample 注釈有

tags: タグなし

プロポーショナルフォント – Wikipedia

プロポーショナルフォント – Wikipedia

プロポーショナルフォント (Proportional Font) とは、文字毎に文字幅が異なるフォントのこと。

伝統的な活版印刷で用いる活字については、例えば「i」と「w」では文字の幅が異なり、ただ並べるだけで読みやすい単語が印字できるようになっている。これがプロポーショナルフォントである。

プロポーショナル・フォントの例


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